Directory

Andrew Joseph Wood

TitlePolitics Doctoral Candidate
DivisionSocial Sciences Division
DepartmentPolitics Department
AffiliationsHistory of Consciousness Department,
Porter College
Phone(831) 459-2855
Email
Web Site Academia.edu
OfficeMerrill 137
Office HoursFriday, 2:00-4:00
Campus Mail StopMerrill College
Andrew Joseph Wood

Research Interests

Politics of Aesthetics, Utopia and Dystopia, Political Imagination, William Morris's Life and Works, Friedrich Nietzsche and his enduring influence, Political Philosophy, Theories of Resistance, Philosophy and Politics of Authenticity, Anarchism in Thought and Practice, Punk Rock

Biography, Education and Training


  • MA: Social Sciences, University of Chicago

  • BS: Political Science, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga



Prior to coming to Santa Cruz, I was also a corps member in Teach for America in the Rio Grande Valley, where I taught English on the Mexican border for two years. I encourage any student considering TFA to contact me or visit office hours to discuss my experience and this post-graduation opportunity.

Honors, Awards and Grants


  • American Academy of Political and Social Sciences (Junior Fellow 2008)

  • Peter Floud Memorial Prize, William Morris Society (2015)

  • Pi Sigma Alpha Political Science Honor Society

  • Politics Travel Fellowship (Summers 2013 & 2014)

  • Porter Associate Fellow

Selected Publications

“Ross on Action, Idea, and the Imaginary: Review of Ross, Kristen. 2015. Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune.” Contained in 2016. Sociological Review, Vol. 00, 1-3. forthcoming


“Gifts of the Garden: Conversations at Dial House,” contained in Dines, Mike (ed.) 2015. Some of Us Scream, Some of Us Shout: Myths, Folklore, and Epic Tales of the Anarcho. U.K.: Itchy Monkey Press.


My work has also appeared in Profane Existence and Counterpunch.

Selected Presentations


  • Upcoming: April 2017, "Never Mind the Museums: The City of London "Celebrates" 40 Years of Punk," Paper presentation, Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conference: San Diego, CA. 


  • April 8, 2016, “Punk the Academy, or Punk as Method,” Invited talk given at the Friday Forum for Graduate Research University of California, Santa Cruz, U.S.A.




  • March 23, 2016, “Crass Compassion: The Existentialism of Penny Rimbaud,” Paper presented & panel chair for “Punk Influences” at the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conference: Seattle, U.S.A.




  • November 5, 2015. “Introduction to the Concept of Utopia,” Invited Guest Lecture, Introduction to Modern Architecture (HAVC 47), University of California, Santa Cruz, U.S.A.




  • May 19, 2015, “Foucault’s Shifting Bodies, Spectacles, and Agencies in Discipline & Punish,” Invited Guest Lecture, Modern Political Thought (Politics 105c), University of California, Santa Cruz, U.S.A.




  • April 10, 2015, “Makers & Breakers: Political Imagination and the Art of Contestation,” Dissertation Research Poster Presented at the Center for Humanities Conference: The World Upside Down, University of California, Merced, U.S.A.




  • April 3, 2015, "The Crucified Skin: Race, Class, and Politics in British Oi! Music," Paper Presented & Panel Chair for “Punk Culture I: Racism, Classism, and Gender in Punk,” Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conference: New Orleans, U.S.A.




  • March 7, 2015, “Occupying Space with Sound: Decoder and Disruption of the Soundscape,” Invited Lecture, Social Fiction Conference, Crown College, University of California, Santa Cruz, U.S.A.




  • April 17, 2014, “Aura, Authenticity, and Anarchy: Punk on Display at the New York Metropolitan Museum,” Paper Presented, Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association National Conference: Chicago, U.S.A.




  • February 20, 2014, “Dial House, Crass, and the Concept of Authenticity,” Paper Presented, Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference: Albuquerque, U.S.A.




  • February 15, 2013, “D.I.Y. as an Anti-Authority Political Strategy,” Paper Presented, Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference: Albuquerque, U.S.A.




  • October 14, 2012, “Do they owe us a living? Punk Rock, Resistance, and Social Movements,” Paper Presented, Theory, Action, and Impact of Social Protest Interdisciplinary Conference: University of Kent, Canterbury, U.K.   



Teaching Interests

Political Theory & Philosophy, Aesthetic Theory & Philosophy, Critical Theory, Utopian and Dystopian Literature, Continental Philosophy (esp. Existentialism, Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, and Poststructuralism), Early Modern & Modern Thought, , Cultural Studies


Original Courses:


Politics 107: Politics of Aesthetics


Aesthetics have long been a subject of philosophical debate, political struggles, and an important topic of critical engagement within 20th/21st century cultural, critical, queer, and affect theories. This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of critical and aesthetic theories, and to expose them to a variety of ways in which aesthetics are mobilized politically. Students will be challenged to consider the politics of aesthetics as well as the aesthetics of politics by engagin multiple historical cases of movements engaging both registers. Students will also weekly examine politico-aesthetic cases to which they can apply lenses from the course for robust analysis. Students should therefore leave the course not only conversant in aesthetic theory, but also with the practical knowledge of performing aesthetic critiques of contemporary politics. 


Politics 190D: Early Socialist & Anarchist Thought


The overall goal of this course in political theory is to present and engage students with the diverse perspectives, theories, and ideological sympathies broadly identified as socialist and anarchist.  Though spanning in time from the 18th-20th centuries the overwhelming focus of this course is in the 19th century, chosen both for the relevance of Marx’s influence and interactions with his contemporaries, the activity of the Workers’ International, and the enduring influence on political thought now of the events and thought of the so-called ‘century of revolutions.’  Students should exit the class with a well-rounded understanding of major currents in the canons of socialism and anarchism, as well as access to vast secondary literatures (preparing them for engagement with current trends in theory as well).  


Politics 118: Topics in Contemporary Political & Critical Theory: Utopia & Dystopia


This course in political and critical theory focuses around the diverse assemblage of thought, art, and literature identified broadly as utopian and/or dystopian.  The course follows the hypothesis that while the 19th century provided the context for a vast renaissance of utopian thought, the traumatic historical events of the first half of the 20th century inspired an important shift towards dystopian thought as hegemonic.  This shift is partly seen in the political imagination as represented in fictional prose and art, but also in the supplanting of the totalizing theories of C19 and early C20 (i.e. most especially Marxian theories of economic totality) by the post-modern and post-structuralist schools as a major current in political theory.  In order to engage, and perhaps contest, this hypothesis, we shall look at and listen to utopian and dystopian novels and films as political theoretical texts alongside contemporary essays in critical theory.  The purpose of the course is to expose students to a variety of literary and critical works, and to use utopian and dystopian thought as a window into foundational engagement with Marxian, Psychoanalytic, Anarchist, Post-structuralist, Feminist, Queer, and Post-colonial theories.


Porter College 61: Introduction to the Politics of Aesthetics


This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of critical and aesthetic theories, and to expose them to a variety of ways in which aesthetics are mobilized politically. Students will be challenged to consider the politics of aesthetics as well as the aesthetics of politics by engagin multiple historical cases of movements engaging both registers. Students will also examine politico-aesthetic cases to which they can apply lenses from the course for robust analysis.